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New Jersey RFID Car Tags

Our RFID car tags utilize a local power source and emit radio waves (electromagnetic radiation at radio frequencies). The tag contains electronically stored information which can be read from up a number of meters away. Unlike a new bar code, the tag does not need to be within type of sight of the reader and may even be embedded in the actual tracked object.

Our RFID car tags will be the most secured service in New Jersey US which is often read at a long distance, to allow entrance to controlled areas without needing to stop and present a new card or punch in the access code

New Jersey RFID Car Tags

Although RFID found implementation in tracking supplies in the late 1980s, it has been in existence since 1939,5,6 when it was first used as an Identify Friend or Foe (IFF) technique in World War II to identify whether airplanes were friend or foe, during night operations by the British Royal Air Force.Another early work exploring RFID is the landmark 1948 paper by Harry Stockman,7 who predicted that “...considerable research and development work has to be done before the remaining basic problems in reflected-power communication are solved and before the field of useful applications is explored.


New Jersey RFID Car Tags

In the 1960s and 1970s, RFID tags found military applications such as equipment and personnel tracking8,9 and some unique commercial applications such as identification and temperature sensing of cattle. The technology has now evolved for use in the railroad industry to track railroad cars, in the automotive industry for automation and tracking purposes, in agriculture and wildlife management to track livestock and wildlife, and in retail as an anti-theft device.Mario Cardullo claims that his 1973 US Patent 3,713,148, a passive radio transponder with memory, was the first true ancestor of modern RFID.

New Jersey RFID Car Tags

The first demonstration of today’s reflected power (backscatter) RFID tags were done at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1973.6 However, the major development in RFID tracking came only in the 1980s and 1990s, when industrial goods needed counterfeit protection, shrinkage protection and tracking through the several stages in the supply chain. In the 1980s, Compaq computer started using RFID tags to trace components through the production process. RFID technology prevents theft or counterfeiting of goods, thus providing security, automatic counting of goods that enter or leave warehouses, thus allowing to keep track of the stock levels. Passive UHF RFID systems are increasingly being employed in distribution and supply chains.


New Jersey RFID Car Tags

The initial benefits of RFID in a warehouse or distribution center environment are mainly derived from automating manual processes and effectively using greater amounts of data. For example, using RFID tags to automate the receiving operation can reduce the labor cost for that function, as well as enhance accuracy and help decrease the amount of time that a carton spends in a distribution center. All the benefits of using an RFID system depend on the varying levels of RFID use, from pallet tagging to item tagging. At the pallet tagging level, RFID offers improvements in product diversion, production planning, inventory control and storage, and vendor-managed inventory programs, among other places. At the case tagging level, RFID presents opportunities for improved demand and supply planning, theft identification, and pick, pack and ship control. In item tagging, RFID allows a variety of benefits, including store-level promotions and pricing, item theft prevention, and capacity planning, among many others.
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